• Do not give your password to anybody. Somebody who is malicious can cause great harm to you and your reputation. It is like leaving your house open for a stranger and walking away.
  • When talking to somebody new on the net, do not give away personal information-like numbers of the credit card used by your parents, your home
  • addresses/phone numbers and such other personal information.
  • If you feel uncomfortable or threatened when somebody on the net feeds you an improper or indecent message inform your parents or elders.
  • Do not break into somebody else’s computer and worse still change things; you are probably destroying a lifetime of hard work by somebody. You may be intelligent but use your intelligence for better things. Somebody else can be as ruthless and as intelligent to break into your system and destroy your creations as well.
  • Do not copy a program that is copyrighted on the net. It is illegal. You are actually stealing somebody else’s hard work. There is a lot of illegally available material on the net. Do not use it yourself.
  • Don’t delete harmful communications (emails, chat logs, posts etc). These may help provide vital information about the identity of the person behind these.
  • Try not to panic.
  • If you feel any immediate physical danger of bodily harm, call your local police.
  • Avoid getting into huge arguments online during chat or discussions with other users.
  • Remember that all other internet users are strangers. You do not know who you are chatting with. So be careful and polite.
  • Be extremely careful about how you share personal information about yourself online.
  • Choose your chatting nickname carefully so as not to offend others.
  • Do not share personal information in public spaces anywhere online, do not give it to strangers, including in e-mail or chat rooms. Do not use your real name or nickname as your screen name or user ID. Pick a name that is gender and age neutral and do not post personal information as part of any user profile.
  • Be extremely cautious about meeting online acquaintances in person. If you choose to meet, do so in a public place and take along a friend.
  • Make sure that your ISP and Internet Relay Chat (IRC) network have an acceptable use policy that prohibits cyber-stalking. And if your network fails to respond to your complaints, consider switching to a provider that is more responsive to user complaints.
  • If a situation online becomes hostile, log off or surf elsewhere. If a situation places you in fear, contact a local law enforcement agency.
  • Save all communications for evidence. Do not edit or alter them in any way. Also, keep a record of your contacts with Internet System
  • Administrators or Law Enforcement Officials.

  • Use strong passwords. Choose passwords that are difficult or impossible to guess. Give different passwords to all other accounts.
  • Make regular back-up of critical data. Back-up must be made at least once in each day. Larger organizations should perform a full back-up weekly and incremental back-up every day. At least once in a month the back-up media should be verified.
  • Use virus protection software. That means three things: having it on your computer in the first place, checking daily for new virus signature updates, and then actually scanning all the files on your computer periodically.
  • Use a firewall as a gatekeeper between your computer and the Internet. Firewalls are usually software products. They are essential for those who keep their computers online through the popular DSL and cable modem connections but they are also valuable for those who still dial in.
  • Do not keep computers online when not in use. Either shut them off or physically disconnect them from Internet connection.
  • Do not open e-mail attachments from strangers, regardless of how enticing the subject line or attachment may be. Be suspicious of any unexpected e-mail attachment from someone you do know because it may have been sent without that personís knowledge from an infected machine.
  • Regularly download security patches from your software vendors